The Bear Cloud

Messages Of Hope

The Bear Cloud is a symbol of hope for me, and I hope these messages will bring you hope as well.

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“Divorce is damaging to your self-esteem and your sense of who you are. Divorce seizes your identity, and it tosses it around in a whirlwind of emotion and lost dreams.” –from Married to Merlot 

One woman inked this tattoo three weeks after her divorce was final.  It is the Finnish term/cultural identity for perseverance in the face of adversity—a constant reminder of the power within.  Karen told me she sometimes finds herself rubbing it, as if for good luck, when she is feeling down.  Her husband had said to her more than once during their marriage that if she ever obtained a tattoo, he would divorce her—and he was not joking. Getting her first tattoo was Karen’s final ink on the divorce papers.   She is of Finnish descent, and a counselor had told her a number of years ago about the word, SISU, and its meaning.  She kept it close to her heart for years and when the divorce was imminent, she was inspired to put that inside piece of her on her outside.  For Karen, it was a fitting finale to a rough year. She knows she will continue to be strong and resilient despite any rough patches or dark times.  Resilience and strength are her core.  Grievous events may happen and knock her about, but they can’t knock her down. Her core keeps her upright and enables her to move one foot and then the other, as she takes the steps toward a happier future. –January 19, 2019

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The first message is about coping. I spoke with a young girl earlier today whose father was a police officer. Amanda was abused by her mother. Wearing turtle-neck long-sleeved knit shirts in the summer (in Florida?) did not key anyone into thinking she might be hiding her bruises? Her father did nothing about it. Pride and community status prevented him from allowing this to be brought out into the open. How could Amanda tell anyone when her own teachers told her she lived with Officer Friendly and that she was lucky as her home was always safe? How did she cope? She escaped as best she could. Amanda took a job at 16 and became a cheerleader. Cheerleading practices along with the required participation at football and basketball games took her out of her abusive home. Amanda also started writing. She wrote about the worst of it; she wrote about her anger, her hate, her feelings. If you are so despondent and feel helpless in your own situation, please pick up a pen and write. Let your thoughts flow through you and let your feelings flow out onto the paper. You will soon know how therapeutic it is. –January 5, 2019